Word Warrior Wednesday, post election blues

Yesterday began with a lot of hope, and ended in tears. Lots of them. And lots of vodka. To me, it would have meant a lot to have both of my home countries led by women. Moreover, not have one of my home countries make the same mistake that my other home country made eighty years ago. Last night, I was afraid for my future and others’. I am an immigrant, and I am female. Just like any woman, IRead more

Happy 2016!

This year’s resolution: write more. When I left my university job in 2014, I gave up what I had thought of as my career. After a few visiting stints, I’d get a tenure track job, I’d work, do my research, be happy- except for that I was not. There was no tenure track job on the horizon, and the thought of starting out somewhere, and leaving the friends and connection you’ve made hurt me. The visiting position I had paidRead more

Microaggressions and IBD

“Crohn’s? Oh, that’s ok to have, it’s treatable.” “So and so has had kidney problems, you just have a dicky tummy” “You can’t feel that bad, if you are still wearing make-up” “But, you are so young! Isn’t RA only for grannies?” “You got a PhD and you have Crohn’s?” “But you look so good” If you suffer from IBD, these utterances probably sound familiar in one way or another. I will go ahead and call them microaggressions. The termRead more

I’m in remission (whatever that means…)- a guest post

I am welcoming my first guest blogger, Mark McNamara! Mark has had Crohn’s disease for 22 years. Originally from Colorado, he currently lives in Portland, OR. With the support of the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America, Mark facilitates a support group in Portland for patients with IBD. Mark works for the Oregon Health & Science University and enjoys hiking and stand up paddle boarding. I’m in remission (whatever that means…) I’m in remission, whatever that means. It’s been fourRead more

I heart colonoscopies- Tips and advice

There is no way around it: Colonoscopies are important. Even if you are not a Crohnie, don’t smoke, don’t have a family history of colon cancers, if you are older than fifty, you should have one every five years. A 2013 study in the New England Journal of Medicine found out that you can lower your risk of developing colo-rectal cancer by 40% through colonoscopies. How? Cancer doesn’t come overnight, and pre-cancerous cells or polyps can be found via colonoscopies.Read more