Minimalism and my Discontents

Does item x bring me joy? Does its energy weigh me down, or is the chi trapped in the room? If so, get rid of it. Box it for a while some say, then get rid of it.

Simplicity. Clarity. Think of what you need, not what you want. What could be wrong with it?Read more

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Crohn’s and the academic job market- a tale

The abysmal situation of the academic job market has received a lot of coverage in recent years, with not much changing, sadly. You can separate academics into different camps: adjuncts and job seekers, the tenured who have compassion but feel helpless, and those who think that everything is amazing the way it is, and who should just shut the hell up and take it. Let me backup and explain the types of academic labor: Tenure-track: This is the unicorn amongRead more

Happy 2016!

This year’s resolution: write more. When I left my university job in 2014, I gave up what I had thought of as my career. After a few visiting stints, I’d get a tenure track job, I’d work, do my research, be happy- except for that I was not. There was no tenure track job on the horizon, and the thought of starting out somewhere, and leaving the friends and connection you’ve made hurt me. The visiting position I had paidRead more

Putting yourself First

In the classical Bildungsroman, the hero undergoes several challenges and hurdles through the course of his (because there are too few heroines in classical Billdungsromans, and don’t get me started on dickens) life. They grow with each challenge and end up being this all around good person. Did I just describe 98.6% of all of Hollywood movies? I generally don’t subscribe to the life-is-a-Bildungsroman view. People don’t become better people by having stuff happening to them- otherwise I’d be allRead more

Chronic illness and making an academic career/working life – unjustified judgements

Originally posted on Improving Vocational Education and Training:
      Despite the challenges they face, people with chronic illnesses can be highly productive, high-functioning members of the academic community. The key to their success lies in institutional policies and practices that ensure equity and support their productivity. By Stephanie A. Goodwin and Susanne Morgan One of the things I find difficult is that many of my colleagues do not know of my illness. I can only assume what they might…